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Henry Giles Quotes





A song will outlive all sermons in the memory.
[Song]
 

Among so many sad realities we can but ill endure to rob anticipation of its pleasant visions.
[Anticipation]
 

Esteem cannot be where there is no confidence; and there can be no confidence where there is no respect.
 

Human faculties are common, but that which converges these faculties into my identity, separates me from every other man. - That other man cannot think my thoughts, speak my words, do my works. - He cannot have my sins, and I cannot have his virtues.
[Individuality]
 

If the poor man cannot always get meat, the rich man cannot always digest it.
[Compensation]
 

It is by faith that poetry, as well as devotion, soars above this dull earth; that imagination breaks through its clouds, breathes a purer air, and lives in a softer light.
 

Man is greater than a world - than systems of worlds; there is more mystery in the union of soul with the body, than in the creation of a universe.
[Man]
 

Man must work. That is certain as the sun. But he may work grudgingly or he may work gratefully; he may work as a man, or he may work as a machine. There is no work so rude, that he may not exalt it; no work so impassive, that he may not breathe a soul into it; no work so dull that he may not enliven it.
[Work]
 

Never is the deep, strong voice of man, or the low, sweet voice of woman, finer than in the earnest but mellow tones of familiar speech, richer than the richest music, which are a delight while they are heard, which linger still upon the ear in softened echoes, and which, when they have ceased, come, long after, back to memory, like the murmurs of a distant hymn.
[Speech]
 

No principle is more noble, as there is none more holy, than that of a true obedience.
[Obedience]
 

The capacity of sorrow belongs to our grandeur, and the loftiest of our race are those who have had the profoundest sympathies, because they have had the profoundest sorrows.
 

The capacity of sorrow belongs to our grandeur; and the loftiest of our race are those who have had the profoundest griefs because they have had the profoundest sympathies.
[Sorrow]
 

The direct relation of music is not to ideas, but to emotions - in the works of its greatest masters, it is more marvelous, more mysterious than poetry.
[Music]
 

The passions are at once tempters and hastisers. As tempters, they come with garlands of flowers on brows of youth; as chastisers, they appear with wreaths of snakes on the forehead of deformity. They are angels of light in their delusion; they are fiends of torment in their inflictions.
[Passion]
 

The record of life runs thus: Man creeps into childhood, - bounds into youth, - sobers into manhood, - softens into age, - totters into second childhood, and slumbers into the cradle prepared for him, - thence to be watched and cared for.
[Man]
 

The silent influence of books, is a mighty power in the world; and there is a joy in reading them known only to those who read them with desire and enthusiasm. - Silent, passive, and noiseless though they be, they yet set in action countless multitudes, and change the order of nations.
[Books]
 

There is no earthly happiness exceeding that of a reciprocal satisfaction in the conjugal state.
[Marriage]
 

There is so much of the glare and grief of life connected with the stage, that it fills me with most solemn thoughts.
 

Wit may be a thing of pure imagination, but humor involves sentiment and character. - Humor is of a genial quality; dwells in the same character with pathos, and is always mingled with sensibility.
[Humor]